User Flowcharts

In my previous post, which you can read here, I outlined changes that I would like to see made to my town’s website. Now, adapting those changes to an app I’m going to demonstrate three different unique user experiences and stories with that app, which I am choosing to call My Mountainside. The purpose of this app is to help residents of Mountainside stay connected to what’s happening in the town, look up information about the town and communicate with others in the town. Functions of the app more specifically include an events calendar where you can sign up/ learn more about upcoming events, a list of businesses in the town including times of operation and the option to make a reservation and lastly a forum to speak to other town residents to have questions answered and meet your neighbors. The target audience for this app is newly moved in residents trying to meet new people and try new things and young families that are looking for fun things to do.

To further develop who is going to be using the app I’m going to create a user story, user scenario, user case and user flow for three different users. This will illustrate who uses the app and how they use they app to find what they need.

User #1

“I just moved to Mountainside with my husband, we love to eat at new restaurants and shop, and we want to know everything that the town has town to offer.”

User 1 uses the Mountainside webpage to try and find local shops, restaurants and artists in town to try. They use the website to seek this out because they enjoy supporting local businesses and try to support them as often as possible.

When using the website this user will open the page, search for the tab that says “Shop Local”, click on it, then find information regarding the various local places they could shop or eat at.

 

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User #2

“I have young children and I don’t want them to sit in front of the television all day. I want us to be involved in our community in ways the whole family can enjoy.”

User 2 uses the Mountainside webpage to try and find upcoming events that can entertain her and her whole family. She wants them to be family friendly but also an entertaining alternative to keep her kids included.

When using the website this user will open the page, search for the upcoming events calendar, click on it, then find information regarding the various upcoming events such as location and time.

 

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User #3

“I recently moved to town and I am expecting a baby coming soon. I want to meet up with other expecting moms and find out some tips from them.”

User 3 uses the Mountainside webpage to try and find other people like her in similar situations. She is new in town and wants to feel like a member of the community in her own way.

When using the website this user will open the page, search for a message board, click on it, then search for a message board related to the topics she wants to find more information on (or create her own), then type out her question or comment on other people’s messages to start a conversation.

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User #4

“I’m an older resident of Mountainside and I want to sign up for events in my community. I’m looking to stay active and continue to be a part of my community in my old age.”

User 4 uses the Mountainside webpage to sign up for programs specialized to older adults in the Mountainside community. He wants to find reasons to stay out of the house now that he is retired, but he isn’t very savvy with computers.

When using the website this user will open the page, search for the recreation tab, click on it, then find the sub tab that’s for adult programs, then click on the upcoming event or information he is looking for in that tab.

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Delving into these user types and creating user flow charts is a great way to understand your audience. It places you in the shoes of your user and maps out what their experience will look like. It’s rare that two users are going on to a site for exactly the same reason, so it helps to think through the different reasons and steps so you can offer them the best user experience possible. These examples could go on for hundreds of more personas, but this is a great way to get to know your audience.

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